Comments

Proc to Prog

A pdf of the complete Praxis Comparative Glossary can be downloaded here.

 

From Procedure to Progressive elaboration

 

Procedure

The terms procedure and process are common throughout all guides to project management.

In common English they are often used interchangeably but there are two key differences.

  • A procedure is normally more detailed than a process.

  • A procedure is more linear and not as focused on inputs and outputs as a process.

The PMBoK® guide and ISO21500 define all management activity as processes regardless of the level of detail. In the PMBoK® guide all processes describe tools and techniques that convert inputs into outputs. ISO21500 processes do not define tools and techniques.

Praxis and PRINCE2 use both terms. Process is used when describing the activities that manage a phase of the life cycle, such as the definition process in Praxis or the Starting Up a Project (SU) process in PRINCE2.

Procedure is used when describing the steps used to perform a function such as risk management or stakeholder management.

Process

The terms process and procedure are common throughout all guides to project management.

In common English they are often used interchangeably but there are two key differences.

  • A process is normally higher level than a procedure.
  • A process converts inputs into outputs.

The PMBoK® guide and ISO21500 define all management activity as processes regardless of the level of detail. In the PMBOK® GUIDE all processes describe tools and techniques that convert inputs into outputs. ISO21500 processes do not define tools and techniques.

Praxis and PRINCE2 use both terms. Process is used when describing the activities that manage a phase of the life cycle, such as the definition process in Praxis or the Starting Up a Project (SU) process in PRINCE2.

Procedure is used when describing the steps used to perform a function such as risk management or stakeholder management.

Process groups (PMBoK® guide)

See project management process groups.

Procurement

More:

Procurement covers the acquisition from a supplier of the products and services required for completion of a project, programme or portfolio. Its goals are to:

  • identify potential external suppliers;
  • select external suppliers;
  • obtain commitment to provision of internal resources.

An ‘external source’ represents any supplier from outside the host organisation. ‘Internal sources’ are departments or divisions within the host organisation.

The equivalents in the PMBoK and ISO21500 are Project Procurement Management knowledge area and the Procurement subject group respectively. PRINCE2 doesn’t go into any detail on the procurement of external products and services.

In the realm of programme management MSP doesn’t go into any detail on the procurement of external products and services, SPgM covers this area in the Program Procurement Management set of supporting processes.

Procurement (ISO21500 subject group)

An ISO21500 subject group that provides a set of processes for managing procurement. The processes comprise:

The equivalent in Praxis is the procurement and contract management functions.

PRINCE2 doesn’t go into any detail on the procurement of external products and services.

The PMBoK® guide and ISO21500 share a very similar structure and the nearest equivalent knowledge area in the PMBoK® guide is project procurement management.

Procurement management plan

The procurement management plan sets out the preferred procedures, tools and techniques to be used in procuring products and services.

Procurement statement of work

A PMBoK® guide term for a statement of work of an item or work package that will be subject to procurement.

In Praxis this would simply be a specification attached to any bidding documents.

Procurement strategy

The APM PSMC term for a procurement management plan.

Produce an exception plan

If a PRINCE2 project stage is outside, or forecast to be outside, its agreed tolerances, then an issue must be escalated to the project board. The project board may request that an exception plan be prepared to show how the issue may be dealt with. This activity covers the production of this plan.

Praxis addresses this in the corrective action activity in the delivery process.

The nearest equivalent in the PMBoK® guide and ISO21500 is the more general term: corrective action. Poor performance on a project may result in a change request for corrective action but since the PMBoK® guide and ISO21500 do not have the formal organisational relationships as PRINCE2, there is no equivalent ‘exception’ mechanism.

Producer

The name PRINCE2 gives to the person or group responsible for developing a product. The term is normally used in the context of a quality review.

Product

A self-contained component of a project’s output. Each product will have a set of acceptance criteria and is only recorded as complete when a quality review confirms that the acceptance criteria have been met.

Some products may be delivered for use and therefore referred to as a deliverable. Some may be gathered together to create a work package that is delegated to an individual, team or supplier.

The PRINCE2 definition goes further and stipulates that a product may be an input or an output, tangible or intangible, that can be described, created and tested. In PRINCE2 there are management products and specialist products.

Product backlog

See backlog.

Product breakdown structure

The PRINCE2 term for a breakdown structure that breaks down the products of a project into increasing levels of detail.

Product checklist

The PRINCE2 term for a list of the products contained in the product breakdown structure.

Product code

The code given to a product that denotes its position in a product breakdown structure.

Product description

In Praxis and PRINCE2 this document describes the purpose, form and components of a product. The product description should be used as the basis for acceptance of the product by the customer.

In the PMBoK® guide this is known as the product scope description.

Product documents

More:

The extent and detail of product documentation is very dependent upon the context of the work. Rather than prescribe separate documents, Praxis provides a list of fields from which suitable documents should be constructed according to the needs of the project or programme. This may result in a simple approach with one document per product or a more extensive approach with separate documents for product descriptions, configuration items and quality records.

Product flow diagram

A PRINCE2 planning tool that shows the sequence in which the products of a project are developed.

Product life cycle

More:

The complete life cycle of a product, from its development via a project life cycle, through its operation and eventual disposal.

If expressed in the form of the Praxis generic project life cycle, the product life cycle has two additional phases covering the period that the output of a project is operated and the its final disposal.

Product scope

A PMBoK® guide term for the features and functions that characterise a product.

Product scope description

A PMBoK® guide term for the description of the features and functions that characterise a product.

In Praxis and PRINCE2 this is known as the product description.

Product status account

Status accounting is a component of configuration management. In PRINCE2 a status report on all, or a selection of, the project’s products is called a product status account.

Product-based planning

This is the approach to planning recommended by PRINCE2. It first involves the development of a product breakdown structure and a product description for each product. The sequence of product development is then shown in a product flow diagram. Activities are then identified as the work needed to transform one product into the next.

Product-based work breakdown structure

A term sometimes used to explicitly represent a work breakdown structure made up of products rather than activities.

Product-based work breakdown structure

See work breakdown structure.

Professionalism

More:

There is a constant and often heated debate within the community about whether P3 management is a profession or not. Those who argue against it are talking about a Profession with a capital ‘P’ where ‘Professionals’ need a licence to practice and can be sued for negligence. Doctors, Lawyers, Accountants amongst others fall into this category of Professional.

This debate is largely academic. What is important is the attitude of people who manage projects, programmes and portfolios.

In Praxis the professionalism function is sub-divided into:

The APM BoK has an almost identical function but this is not an area covered in detail in any of the other guides.

Program

In most cases the British English (programme) and American English (program) are synonymous.

However, the GAO SAG only uses the term program in the context of a project schedule rather than a collection of projects managed in a co-ordinated way.

Program Activities

A SPgM term for any work performed within a program.

Program Benefits Delivery

The second phase of the SPgM three-phase life cycle. It contains 19 supporting processes that are equivalent to the work done in the delivery and benefits realisation processes in Praxis.

Similarly, they cover the same ground as the Delivering the Capability, Realizing the Benefits and Managing the Tranches in the MSP transformational flow.

Program Benefits Management

The SPgM term for benefits management.

Program Charter

This is a key document in the SPgM. It is the document that is developed in the Program Integration Management process. Authorisation of the program charter gives authority to apply organisational resources to the program.

The broad equivalent in Praxis and MSP is the programme brief.

Program Closure

The third phase of the SPgM three-phase life cycle. It contains four supporting processes that are equivalent to the work done in the closure process in Praxis.

Similarly, they cover the same ground as the Closing a Programme process in the MSP transformational flow.

It is also a SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic. This process is invoked when the program has satisfied the requirements of its charter or is no longer able to meet those requirements.

It is concerned with producing the final program reports; recording lessons learned and the transition of ownership of outcomes to business-as-usual teams. The program organisation is demobilised and contracts closed.

Program Communications Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with communication and performance reporting. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

Program Cost Budgeting

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic.
This process collates all the available financial information on the program in order to produce an initial cost baseline against which financial performance can be tracked. The three outputs of the process are: the program budget baseline, program payment schedules and component payment schedules.

Praxis covers this activity in the budgeting and cost control function. MSP does not address financial activities in this much detail.

Program Cost Estimation

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic.
Although this process is classified in the Program Definition phase, the text makes it clear that cost estimating is “performed throughout the course of the program”. The output of this process are estimates of the whole life cost that starts off as an order-of-magnitude estimate and is progressively refined through Component Cost Estimation.

This work is covered in principle by Praxis in its planning function with some detail on how to value benefits in benefits management. MSP addresses some of these matters in its business case theme.

Program Definition

The first phase of the SPgM three-phase life cycle. It contains 13 supporting processes that are equivalent to the work done in the identification and definition processes in Praxis.

Similarly, they cover the same ground as the Identifying a Programme and Defining a Programme processes in the MSP transformational flow.

Program Delivery Management

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic that initiates and co-ordinates the program components including the transition of outputs from projects to business-as-usual in order to realise benefits.

These activities are covered by the delivery and benefits realisation processes in Praxis and the Delivering the Capability and Realizing the Benefits processes in MSP.

Program evaluation and review technique (PERT)

More:

The program evaluation and review technique (PERT) was developed for the Polaris project in 1956. It is based on the idea of estimating three durations for each activity rather than the single estimate used in critical path analysis. It bears no relation to the current use of the term programme in the context of programme management.

In PERT analysis three estimates are made for each activity:

  • Optimistic (very unlikely that the activity will take shorter than this).
  • Pessimistic (very unlikely that the activity will take longer than this). 
  • Most likely (this is what we really think it will take).

These durations are assumed to lie on a beta distribution. A mean duration is calculated and used in a critical path analysis. The project end date is then assumed to lie on a normal distribution and potential end dates can be calculated for various standard deviations from the mean.

Program Financial Closure

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic.
Closing down the finances of the program will involve making final payments and also making provisions to ensure ongoing benefits realisation activities are funded.

Praxis performs this work as part of the closure process and although MSP dos not address financial closure in detail, this work is implicit within the Closing a Programme process.

Program Financial Framework

An initial outline plan in SPgM for determining how the program will be funded and how funds will be allocated across the program taking all constraints into account.

This is an output of the Program Financial Framework Establishment process.

Program Financial Framework Establishment

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic.
This process addresses the initial funding of a program and the creation of a framework for managing the cash flows throughout the program. The initial output is the program financial framework. As the program progresses other outputs will be updates to the business case and stakeholder communications.

Praxis deals primarily with these areas in the funding and budgeting and cost control functions. MSP does not address funding and financial frameworks.

Program Financial Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with financial management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

Program Closure

The equivalent in Praxis is the financial management procedure. MSP does not address this in any detail but does cover some aspects in the business case theme.

Program Financial Management Plan Development

The SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic that is concerned with developing a financial management plan for a program.

Praxis addresses this in the planning step of the financial management procedure. MSP does address financial management in any detail other than specific areas related to the business case (e.g. financial evaluation of benefits)

Program Financial Monitoring and Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Financial Management topic that addresses the monitoring and control of costs against the program’s cost baseline.

Praxis covers this in the budgeting and cost control function. MSP does not address financial activities in this much detail.

Program Governance

The structures, processes and systems used to manage and support a program by its host organisation.

Program Governance Plan

A plan that sets out how a program will be governed including roles and responsibilities. In effect, a consolidation of management plans as they apply to a program.

Program Infrastructure Development

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic that covers the formation of the wider program management team and the systems they need to operate.

In Praxis this is the application of the mobilisation function during the definition process. In MSP it would take place in the Defining a Programme process.

Program Initiation

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic. It is concerned with appointments to key roles, such as the program manager and sponsor; identifying funding; updating the business case and developing the program charter.

Praxis covers these activities in its identification process and MSP in its Identifying a Programme process.

Program Integration Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with more detailed elements of the main three phase life cycle. The activities are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

Program Closure

Although the standard cites a top level three-phase life cycle, the processes in the Program Integration Management (much as the processes in the Project Integration Management knowledge area in the PMBoK®) provide more detailed life cycle management processes. It is these supporting processes that provide the greater correlation with the Praxis and MSP life cycle processes.

Program Life Cycle Management

A SPgM term that simply covers all management activities that relate to the three program life cycle phases.

Program Life Cycle Phases

The SPgM has a very simple, top level life cycle comprising three phases:

Program Management

See programme management

Program Management Information Systems

Systems and techniques used to facilitate information management for one or more programs.

Program Management Office

See PMO

Program Management Plan

In the SPgM this is the section of the program management plan that deal with how quality planning, control and assurance will be managed.

The equivalent in MSP is the quality and assurance strategy, Praxis regards quality planning as being inherent in all other management plans.

Program Management Plan Development

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic that covers the development of the program’s management plans.

In Praxis this activity takes place in the prepare governance documents activity in the definition process and in MSP it takes place in the Defining a Programme process.

Program Master Schedule

A high level schedule defined in the SPgM that lists dates derived from a model of logical dependencies between key milestones, components and high level benefits realisation activities. The dependency and schedule information may be summarised graphically as a roadmap.

MSP doesn’t define a master schedule but does refer to the logical models and plans from which such a schedule could be derived. These are a dependency network and a benefits realisation plan.

Program Performance Metrics

Defined in the SPgM as the measures that are used to evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency and results of the processes used to manage the program.

Program Performance Monitoring and Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic that deals with the day-to-day monitoring of performance and control actions taken to maintain or improve performance.

Praxis covers this in the delivery process and MSP in the Delivering the Capability and Realizing the Benefits processes.

Program Performance Reporting

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Communications Management topic. It addresses the way that progress information is prepared and reported to stakeholders.

In Praxis this work is primarily covered by the control and stakeholder management procedures, and in MSP by the Leadership and stakeholder engagement and planning and control themes.

Program Procurement

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Procurement Management topic. It deals with issuing tenders, evaluating responses and awarding contracts.

Praxis covers this in the procurement function. MSP does not address the procurement of external resources.

Program Procurement Administration

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Procurement Management topic.
Responsibility for contracts awarded in the Program Procurement process will often pass to the program’s components but the program manager will retain an overall co-ordination and progress checking responsibility.

Praxis covers this in the procurement function. MSP does not address the procurement of external resources.

Program Procurement Closure

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Procurement Management topic. It covers the closure of contracts awarded by the Program Procurement procedure including the capture of any lessons learned.

Praxis covers this in the procurement function. MSP does not address the procurement of external resources.

Program Procurement Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with financial management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

Program Closure

The equivalent in Praxis is the procurement procedure. MSP does not address procurement in any detail.

Program Procurement Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Procurement Management topic.
This process is concerned with identifying what needs to be procured and how procurement can be best co-ordinated across all the program components. Its main outputs are procurement standards, a program procurement plan and updates to the budgets and financial plans.

The same activities are covered in the early steps of the procurement procedure in Praxis. The content of the SPgM procurement plan would typically be contained in a Praxis resource management plan.

Program Quality Assurance

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Quality Management topic that ensures that the program is complying with the relevant policies and standards.

Praxis deals with this in the assurance function and MSP covers it in the Quality and assurance management theme.

Program Quality Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Quality Management topic that deal with quality control.

In Praxis this is covered by the control function and activities within the delivery and development processes and MSP covers it in the Quality and assurance management theme.

Program Quality Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with quality management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

Praxis takes the view that quality should be inherent in all functions and processes and therefore should not be a separate subject. Instead, quality planning is simply a part of the planning function, quality control is simply a part of the control function and quality assurance is the same as the assurance function.

MSP addresses quality in its Quality and assurance management theme.

Program Quality Plan

An element of the SPgM program management plan that describes how the host organisation’s quality policies will be implemented on the program.

Praxis covers the application of quality in multiple management plans. The equivalent in MSP is the quality and assurance strategy.

Program Quality Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Quality Management topic that deals with creating a program quality plan for the performance of quality assurance and quality control.

In Praxis this is inherent in the collective management plans. MSP covers this by explaining the creation of the ‘quality and assurance strategy’ document in the Quality and assurance management theme.

Program Resource Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with resource management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

The nearest equivalents in Praxis are elements of the resource scheduling and resource management functions. MSP doesn’t address resource management in any great detail.

Program Risk

The SPgM term for a program risk event. This does not refer to the overall level of risk on the program.

Program Risk Analysis

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Risk Management topic.
This process deals with the quantitative and qualitative analysis of risk in order to update the risk register and produce risk related reports.

Both Praxis and MSP refer to this as the assess step in the corresponding risk management procedures.

Program Risk Identification

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Risk Management topic.
This process deals with the identification of risk events and its output is a risk register.

Both Praxis and MSP refer to this as the identify step in the corresponding risk management procedures.

Program Risk Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with risk management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

Program Definition

Program Benefits Delivery

The equivalent in Praxis is the risk management function and in MSP it is the risk and issue management theme.

Program Risk Management Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Risk Management topic.

This process deals with the definition of how risk will be managed on the program. Its output is a risk management plan.

The equivalent in Praxis is the plan step in the risk management procedure that also produces a risk management plan.

MSP combines risk with issues in the risk and issue management theme. The equivalent plan is called the risk management strategy.

Program Risk Monitoring and Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Risk Management topic that deals with the implementation of risk responses.

Praxis refers to this as the implement responses step in its risk management procedure. MSP simply calls it the implement step in its risk management cycle.

Program Risk Register

The SPgM version of a risk register.

Program Risk Response Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Risk Management topic.
This process plans responses to the risks that have been identified and analysed.

Praxis refers to this as the plan responses step in its risk management procedure. MSP simply calls it the plan step in its risk management cycle.

Program Schedule Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Schedule Management that deals with the monitoring and control of the program components.

In Praxis this is covered by the application of the control function during the delivery process. In MSP it is covered by the application of the Planning and Control theme during the Managing the Tranches process

Program Schedule Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with schedule management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

The equivalent in Praxis is the schedule management function and in MSP it is the planning and control theme.

Program Schedule Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Schedule Management topic that takes the outputs of Program Scope Planning and identifies the components that will be needed to deliver the scope. It also covers the creation of a schedule management plan. Other key outputs are the roadmap and program master schedule.

In Praxis this is primarily addressed by the schedule management function as applied in the definition process. In MSP it is primarily covered by the Planning and control theme as applied in the Defining a Programme process.

Program Scope Control

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Scope Management topic that monitors and controls the delivery of the program’s scope.

In Praxis this work is mainly covered by the benefits realisation and delivery processes with particular reference to the change control function. In MSP it is the Delivering the capability and Realising the benefits processes.

Program Scope Management

A set of SPgM supporting process that contains activities dealing with scope management. The component activities (categorised by life cycle phase) are:

The equivalent in Praxis is the scope management function and in MSP it is primarily a combination of elements from the blueprint design and delivery and benefits management themes.

Program Scope Planning

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Scope Management topic that is concerned with defining the scope of the program.

It combines scope management planning that results in a scope management plan with the work to identify the scope of the program.

In addition to the scope management plan the outputs are a scope statement and program work breakdown structure.

These areas are covered by Praxis in the scope management function. In MSP the scope of the program is contained in the blueprint, projects dossier and benefits register which are outputs of the blueprint design and delivery and benefits management themes.

Program Sponsor

A SPgM term for someone within an organisation who is responsible for providing funding for a program. This is not the same as a programme sponsor in Praxis or MSP. For that role in SPgM see executive sponsor.

Program Stakeholder Engagement

The term used by the SPgM for stakeholder management.

Program Stakeholders

The SPgM term for stakeholders.

Program Strategy Alignment

A term used by the SPgM to represent the work required to ensure that that the program meets organisational strategic objectives – and also to monitor the degree to which alignment is successful.

Program Team

A SPgM term for anyone who works on a program or any of its components.

This is the equivalent of the combined programme management team, programme delivery team, change management teams and project teams in Praxis.

Program Transition and Benefits Sustainment

A SPgM supporting process from the Program Integration Management topic that covers the final transition of the program’s outputs to business-as-usual including the activities that are required to ensure that benefits realisation is sustained after the closure of the program.

In Praxis this is part of the benefits realisation process that is deemed to continue after the closure of the program. A similar approach is taken by MSP which addresses these matters in the Realizing the Benefits process.

Programme

More:

The term programme has different meanings to different people. Historically, the term has been used to describe a simple bar chart and this is still in common use in many industries (e.g. construction).

In other fields it is now generally accepted that a programme is a collection of projects managed in a co-ordinated way to create benefits for the host organisation.

Programme and project support office (PPSO)

An organisation set up to provide combined programme support and project support. This could be a team set up for the support of a specific programme and its projects or an organisation-wide team that supports all the projects and programmes in a portfolio.

Programme assurance

See assurance.

Programme board

In MSP this is a group that is established to assist the Senior Responsible Owner (SRO) to undertake their sponsorship of a programme.

Programme brief

See brief

Programme management

More:

The day to day management of a programme by a programme management team led by a programme manager.

The central elements of programme management are:

  • having a clear reason why the work is necessary;
  • capturing requirements, specifying objectives, estimating resources and timescales;
  • preparing a business case to explain that the work is desirable, achievable and viable;
  • securing funding for the work;
  • developing and implementing management plans;
  • leading and motivating the management team and delivery teams;
  • monitoring and controlling scope, schedule, finance, risk and resources;
  • maintaining good relations with stakeholders;
  • closing the project or programme in a controlled manner when appropriate.

Programme management office

See PMO.

Programme manager

The individual with overall responsibility for the day-to-day management of a programme.

Programme mandate

See mandate.

Programme office

In MSP this function provides an information hub and is the custodian of standards. The office may serve multiple programmes.

Programme organization (MSP theme)

The MSP theme that describes the organisation management of a programme on a role by role basis.

Programme sponsor

See sponsor.

Programme support

See support.

Programme support office (PSO)

An organisation giving programme support to the programme management team.

Progress (PRINCE2 theme)

The progress theme establishes and implements mechanisms to monitor progress and ensure appropriate corrective action is taken.

The equivalent in Praxis is the control topic.

The closest equivalent in the PMBoK® guide is the combination of processes in the monitoring and controlling process group. In ISO21500 it is a similar combination of the processes in the controlling process group.

Progress date

The base date used for estimating progress of a project or programme. All estimates to complete or remaining durations should be assessed in relation to the status of activities on this date.

Computer scheduling packages will then schedule any work not yet complete after this date.

The PMBoK® guide refers to this as the data date and the GAO SAG refers to it as the status date.

Progress payment

An interim payment made to a supplier on the basis of agreed work performed or products delivered. Payment could be triggered by the passage of time (i.e. monthly valuation of work completed) or by completion of a milestone or deliverable.  Progress payments are often subject to retention.

The PMBoK® guide calls this retainage.

Progress report

Progress needs to be communicated at regular intervals. This may be, for example, from an individual to their team manager; from a supplier to a project manager; from a project manager to a programme manager. A progress report may cover a small work package, change management activity in a business area or an entire programme in a portfolio.

Progress reports are typically produced at regular intervals as opposed to an event report that is produced when a milestone, or other specific event, is achieved.

Progress reporting

The process of gathering information on work done and revised estimates, updating the delivery plans and distributing the revised plan with a commentary on progress and forecasts.

Progressive elaboration

The PMBoK® guide term for the process of increasing the amount of detail in the project management plan as more information and hence better estimates become available.

 

SHARE THIS PAGE

14.Feb.2017Updated to version 1.3 including the PMI's standard for program management

Proc to Prog

Back to top