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Scope management

If you are new to the idea of Team Praxis, please read our introduction to the concept before using the table below to improve your communications with team members, stakeholders and anyone else involved in your project, programme or portfolio.

The goals of scope management are to:

  • identify stakeholder wants and needs;
  • specify outputs, outcomes and benefits that meet agreed requirements;
  • maintain scope throughout the life cycle.

When implementing these goals people with different character traits would perceive scope management plans and techniques in different ways.

Concientious behaviour would typically propose or want to see:

  • a consistent and systematic approach to managing scope with stakeholder involvement;

  • a structured and quantitative approach to assessing multiple requirements and agreement of a comprehensive baseline with all stakeholders;

  • a detailed description of the scope captured centrally under rigorous version-control;

  • a structured and objective approach to evaluate potential solutions;

    selection of an optimum based on agreed objective criteria;

  • a comprehensive and detailed specification of the solution captured formally;

  • a robust process to capture and assess stakeholders’ requests for change against the agreed baseline;

  • comprehensive evaluation of the viability and achievability changes using historical data and formal assessment of any increased risk;

  • comprehensive updating of the scope baseline and formal communication with the team.

Someone exhibiting concientious behaviour would typically be perceived as:

  • formal and objective;

  • supportive of methodical and proven techniques and processes;

  • wishing to see well researched and validated information used;

  • demanding in terms of the quality and level of detail of the information needed to make a considered decision;

  • favouring an iterative approach to the development of the scope and solution to reduce uncertainty;

  • seeking perfection.

Dominant behaviour would typically propose or want to see:

  • a focused and quick process to manage scope;

  • a concise and efficient process of assessing multiple requirements and a baseline agreed by all stakeholders;

  • a high-level summary of the scope providing only core information to key decision makers and maintained only when necessary;

  • an objective and focused approach to evaluate solutions and fast selection of the optimum against agreed objective criteria;

  • a sufficiently detailed description of the specification to allow follow on activities to commence;

  • a short and formal process to capture and assess stakeholders’ requests for scope changes;

  • an efficient and focused process for assessing changes with reference back to the baseline;

  • updating of documents and the baseline only when necessary and clear communication to people of any new expectations.

Someone exhibiting dominant behaviour would typically be perceived as:

  • direct and no-nonsense;

  • working broadly to the scope management process until they believe it hinders progress;

  • challenging what they are told and always seeking ways to deliver more efficiently to meet stakeholder requirements;

  • dismissive of activities that they perceive as unnecessary and bureaucratic and slowing the agreement of the scope;

  • decisive when choices need to be made even when there is uncertainty.

Steady behaviour would typically propose or want to see:

  • a focus on intangible as well as tangible requirements and scope gathered comprehensively through discussions with stakeholders;

  • a balanced approach to assessing multiple requirements and agreement of a baseline with all stakeholders;

  • a comprehensive and well maintained description of the scope used to ensure the team and stakeholders have a common understanding;

  • discussions with stakeholders of potential solutions and a structured approach to evaluation and selection of the optimum solution, based on agreed subjective and objective criteria;

  • a comprehensive and detailed specification of the solution shared with the team;

  • a formal process to discuss and then capture and assess stakeholders’ requests for change against the agreed baseline;

  • detailed evaluation of the viability and achievability of the change including the impact on people;

  • a clear process for communicating any agreed changes and confirmation of them accepting and including for the change.

Someone exhibiting steady behaviour would typically be perceived as:

  • co-operative, easy to approach, supportive and happy to input to help others;

  • empathetic to the impact on people of decisions made on the scope and solution;

  • cautious as they work through agreed processes and wishing to minimise risk;

  • diligent when working through processes;

  • indecisive when decisions need to be made when there is uncertainty or time pressures.

Influential behaviour would typically propose or want to see:

  • discussion with a broad stakeholder group to identify, capture and assess objective and subjective requirements and scope;

  • an open approach to assessing multiple requirements and consensual agreement of a baseline by stakeholders;

  • an informative high-level summary of the scope ensuring the team and stakeholders have a common understanding through group briefings;

  • open and group stakeholder discussions of potential solutions and evaluation and selection of the optimum based on agreed subjective and objective criteria;

  • a specification which captures sufficient detail;

  • a simple process to discuss and then capture and assess stakeholders’ requests for change;

  • a collaborative approach to the evaluation of the impact on any changes to the scope;

  • updating the scope when the team feel that including the agreed changes is necessary.

  • Someone exhibiting influential behaviour would typically be perceived as:
  • taking an informal and collaborative approach to scoping;

  • innovative and wishing to see people involved in identifying options;

  • informal and often applying the minimum level of, or working around, the process where seen as constraining;

  • fast paced and wishing to see activities starting quickly without being overly burdened by process;

  • making decisions based on gut feel even when there is uncertainty and later backing up with data.

 

 

Thanks to Donnie MacNicol of Team Animation for providing this page.

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Scope management

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